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Speech: Function of Gestures, The


Published 1950


Gestures render public speeches much more effective.


Run time 9:44
Producer Centron Corporation
Sponsor N/A
Audio/Visual Sd, B&W

Shotlist

Explains the function of the gesture in public speaking and points out how speeches can be made much more effective by using the correct gestures at the correct time. Gives some specific examples of some commonly used gestures and their function.

Ken Smith sez: Another pre-television, pre-naturalism relic, from a time when the public could be swayed by how dramatically you pointed and flailed your arms. We're shown the speaking technique of "George Jackson," who believes he's a good speaker, but the narrator calls him "old stone face." "George's audiences wish they were somewhere else," the narrator confides, and then we're shown why; George is wooden on stage, and doesn't understand that "freedom of the body helps in freeing the mind." "If you're going to impress them you must interest them!" the narrator insists. "What you say must sound and look real and sincere."
The film ends -- but then we realize that we've been watching a film-within-a-film in some nameless civic club -- and that the now-humiliated George was watching along with us! George has learning his lesson, and as the film finally ends as we see him standing before a mirror at home, practicing pointing and flailing his arms.

SPEECHES PUBLIC SPEAKING GESTURES SPEECH ORATORY TALKING
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Reviews

Reviewer: Mr. - - June 30, 2007
Subject: Speech: The Function of Gestures
Some entertaining nutso animation in here. Recommended.
Reviewer: ERD - - June 11, 2006
Subject: Dated but good for its time
The gestures and inflection used back in 1950 are now dated in many ways. Some of the information given, however, was good. In general-it was an entertaining instructional film on speech making for its era.
Reviewer: Spuzz - - June 15, 2005
Subject: The people in Africa can be tall, or they could be short!
Bizarre little movie here that teaches us it's not what you say, it's how you say it. A speech about Africa used in the first example is the most ludicrous. "People in Africa, can be short, or they can be tall! They can be fat, or skinny! I guess you can say they have people of many different sizes!" Anyways, you can detect the bad speakers.. They're the ones with the crooked collars and unfolded handkerchief. The good ones always speak in front of american flags. After explaining of what makes a good speech (love the lightning bolt chart used for no reason). Our original speaker is back, emphasising up a storm. Yay! Reccomended!
Reviewer: Christine Hennig - - December 19, 2002
Subject: Speech: The Function of Gestures
George is a dealthly dull after-dinner speaker who thinks he's great because he keeps getting invited to speak, probably because of a severe shortage of speakers in his town. John, however, is invited to speak because he's genuinely interesting. The difference between the two? John uses gestures when he speaks, while George just stands there like a mannequin and drones on and on and on. The film gets weird when illustrations are shown of George's body wrapped up tightly in rope (slightly weird), George's enlarged cranium wrapped up tightly in rope (really weird), and a mutant arm attached to George's head which is gesturing wildly (incredibly weird). It also gets weird at the end, when we are told that the film was not really made for a general audience, but was directed specifically at George in order to correct his speaking faults. It ends with an obviously drunk George gesturing like a maniac. Just what was going on at Centron when this was made, I wonder?
Ratings: Camp/Humor Value: ****. Weirdness: *****. Historical Interest: ***. Overall Rating: ****. Also available on Lifestyles USA, Vol. 2.
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